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Passepartout accompanied him, carrying a pair of revolvers.  Aouda remained in the car, as pale as death. The door of the next car opened, and Colonel Proctor appeared on the platform, attended by a Yankee of his own stamp as his second.  But just as the combatants were about to step from the train, the conductor hurried up, and shouted, “You can’t get off, gentlemen!” “Why not?” asked the colonel. “We are twenty minutes late, and we shall not stop.” “But I am going to fight a duel with this gentleman.” “I am sorry,” said the conductor; “but we shall be off at once. There’s the bell ringing now.” The train started. “I’m really very sorry, gentlemen,” said the conductor.  “Under any other circumstances I should have been happy to oblige you.

But, after all, as you have not had time to fight here, why not fight as we go along?” “That wouldn’t be convenient, perhaps, for this gentleman,” said the colonel, in a jeering tone. “It would be perfectly so,” replied Phileas Fogg. “Well, we are really in America,” thought Passepartout, “and the conductor is a gentleman of the first order!” So muttering, he followed his master. The two combatants, their seconds, and the conductor passed through the cars to the rear of the train.  The last car was only occupied by a dozen passengers, whom the conductor politely asked if they would not be so kind as to leave it vacant for a few moments, as two gentlemen had an affair of honour to settle.

The passengers granted the request with alacrity, and straightway disappeared on the platform. The car, which was some fifty feet long, was very convenient for their purpose.  The adversaries might march on each other in the aisle, and fire at their ease.  Never was duel more easily arranged.  Mr. Fogg and Colonel Proctor, each provided with two six-barrelled revolvers, entered the car.  The seconds, remaining outside, shut them in.  They were to begin firing at the first whistle of the locomotive.  After an interval of two minutes, what remained of the two gentlemen would be taken from the car. Nothing could be more simple.  Indeed, it was all so simple that Fix and Passepartout felt their hearts beating as if they would crack. They were listening for the whistle agreed upon, when suddenly savage cries resounded in the air, accompanied by reports which certainly did not issue from the car where the duellists were.  The reports continued in front and the whole length of the train.

Cries of terror proceeded from the interior of the cars. Colonel Proctor and Mr. Fogg, revolvers in hand, hastily quitted their prison, and rushed forward where the noise was most clamorous.  They then perceived that the train was attacked by a band of Sioux. This was not the first attempt of these daring Indians, for more than once they had waylaid trains on the road.  A hundred of them had, according to their habit, jumped upon the steps

Author

Siska

Watching ice melt. This is fun. I am not a killer. I’m real proud of you for coming, bro. I know you hate funerals. I have a dark side, too. I will not kill my sister. I will not kill my sister. I will not kill my sister.

Comments

  1. Siska    

    Woow….. Very beautiful place to visit. Someday I will

    1. Fahri Max    

      Let’s go together next week, if you have time 😀

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