shadow

“Why, don’t you know?” she returned, in surprise. “No, indeed. I don’t know anything. You see, I am stuffed, so I have no brains at all,” he answered sadly. “Oh,” said Dorothy, “I’m awfully sorry for you.”

“Do you think,” he asked, “if I go to the Emerald City with you, that Oz would give me some brains?” “I cannot tell,” she returned, “but you may come with me, if you like. If Oz will not give you any brains you will be no worse off than you are now.” “That is true,” said the Scarecrow. “You see,” he continued confidentially, “I don’t mind my legs and arms and body being stuffed, because I cannot get hurt. If anyone treads on my toes or sticks a pin into me, it doesn’t matter, for I can’t feel it.

But I do not want people to call me a fool, and if my head stays stuffed with straw instead of with brains, as yours is, how am I ever to know anything?” “I understand how you feel,” said the little girl, who was truly sorry for him.  “If you will come with me I’ll ask Oz to do all he can for you.” “Thank you,” he answered gratefully. They walked back to the road.  Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City. Toto did not like this addition to the party at first.  He smelled around the stuffed man as if he suspected there might be a nest of rats in the straw, and he often growled in an unfriendly way at the Scarecrow. “Don’t mind Toto,” said Dorothy to her new friend.  “He never bites.” “Oh, I’m not afraid,” replied the Scarecrow.  “He can’t hurt the straw. Do let me carry that basket for you.  I shall not mind it, for I can’t get tired.  I’ll tell you a secret,” he continued, as he walked along.

“There is only one thing in the world I am afraid of.” “What is that?” asked Dorothy; “the Munchkin farmer who made you?” “No,” answered the Scarecrow; “it’s a lighted match.” After a few hours the road began to be rough, and the walking grew so difficult that the Scarecrow often stumbled over the yellow bricks, which were here very uneven.  Sometimes, indeed, they were broken or missing altogether, leaving holes that Toto jumped across and Dorothy walked around.  As for the Scarecrow, having no brains, he walked straight ahead, and so stepped into the holes and fell at full length on the hard bricks.  It never hurt him, however, and

Dorothy would pick him up and set him upon his feet again, while he joined her in laughing merrily at his own mishap. The farms were not nearly so well cared for here as they were farther back.  There were fewer houses and fewer fruit trees, and the farther they went the more dismal and lonesome the country became.

At noon they sat down by the roadside, near a little brook, and Dorothy opened her basket and got out some bread.  She offered a piece to the Scarecrow, but he refused. “I am never hungry,” he said, “and it is a lucky thing I am not, for my mouth is only painted, and if I should cut a hole in it so I could eat, the straw I am stuffed with would come out, and that would spoil the shape of my head.” Dorothy saw at once that this was true, so she only nodded and went on eating her bread. “Tell me something about yourself and the country you came from,” said the Scarecrow, when she

Review Scores
Storyline: 3.1
Theme: 3.5
Character: 3.8
Climax: 3.5

3.5

Good
If anyone treads on my toes or sticks a pin into me, it doesn't matter, for I can't feel it. But I do not want people to call me a fool, and if my head stays stuffed with straw instead of with brains

User Rating: 4.1 (11 votes) Thank you. Your vote has been saved.

Author

Siska

Watching ice melt. This is fun. I am not a killer. I’m real proud of you for coming, bro. I know you hate funerals. I have a dark side, too. I will not kill my sister. I will not kill my sister. I will not kill my sister.

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